Lawyers are responsible for representing and advising government agencies, businesses, and individuals on legal disputes and issues. These professionals usually work in private offices, and some also work for the state, local, and federal governments.
Lawyers working in Pennsylvania are well-paid. Occupational data published by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that lawyers employed in Pennsylvania earned a yearly mean pay of $142,890 in May 2019.
If you want to establish a career in this field, then read this guide on how to become a Lawyer in Pennsylvania.

Should I Become a Lawyer in Pennsylvania?

Do you have good communication, listening, and people skills? If yes, then you are likely to succeed as a lawyer.
In order to join the legal profession, you will have to meet certain skill-set, training, and education requirements, which have been briefly discussed below.

  • Education Required
  • Training
  • Licenses/Certifications
  • Key Skills/Qualities
  • Annual Mean Salary (2019)-National
  • Job Outlook(2018-2028)
  • Annual Mean Salary (2019)-Pennsylvania
  • Doctoral or professional degree.
  • On-the-job training is not required.
  • Lawyers have to get licensed.
  • Analytical Skills, Interpersonal Skills, Problem-solving Skills, Research Skills, Speaking Skills, and Writing Skills.
  • $145,300
  • 6% (Lawyers)
  • $142,890

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Outlook

The demand for lawyers is predicted to increase by 6% during 2018 to 2028, which will create around 50,100 jobs. These figures have been taken from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Steps to Become a Lawyer in Pennsylvania

Aspiring lawyers are required to undertake a series of steps in order to join the legal profession. This section discusses these steps in great detail.

Complete Undergraduate Education

The first step is to complete an undergraduate education from an accredited college or university. You can major in a variety of subjects such as Political Science, Economics, History or Sociology. While studying in college, you can also work at a local courthouse or a law firm as an intern to gain some practical experience.

Pass the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

The Pennsylvania Board of Law Examiners has made it mandatory for students to graduate from an accredited law school in order to get a license. The law school will require you to clear the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) to get admitted into their program. This standardized exam will test your writing, comprehension, analytical and logical reasoning skills.

Enroll in a Law School

After passing the LSAT, you will have to submit your law school application. The admissions committee will make its decision after reviewing your application, LSAT score, interview score and transcripts. Once you get into law school, you will have to invest three years to earn a Juris Doctor (J.D) degree.

Pass the Pennsylvania State Bar Exam to Become Licensed

Once you have graduated from law school, you will be expected to take the Pennsylvania Bar Examination. Passing this exam will make you eligible to practice law in the state.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Lawyer in Pennsylvania?

Becoming a lawyer typically requires completion of seven years of full-time study after graduating from high school. You will have to first complete a four-year long undergraduate program. After completing the bachelor’s degree, you will have to spend three years at an accredited law school in order to earn a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree. Once you graduate from law school, you will be expected to pass the bar examination in order to get licensed.

What Are the Requirements for Becoming a Lawyer in Pennsylvania?

Candidates who want to practice law in Pennsylvania are required to meet the following requirements. They need to:

  • Earn an undergraduate degree from an accredited university or college.
  • Obtain a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree.
  • Pass the written bar examination administered under the authority of or by the Board of Law Examiners.
  • Complete the Bridge the Gap program.

*To find out more about the state-specific requirements, you are advised to visit the relevant state page.

How Much Does a Lawyer Earn in Pennsylvania?