Get information about how to become a lawyer in Alabama with this detailed guide on the education, licensing and career requirements for this profession in Alabama.

Should I Become a Lawyer in Alabama?

Lawyers are highly skilled professionals who represent and advise businesses and individuals on legal matters. The job duties of a lawyer would vary according to their title and the place of employment. For instance, public-interest lawyers would work for private, nonprofit organizations, whereas corporate counsels would work for corporations. Lawyers can also specialize in a particular legal field – such as environmental law, tax law or intellectual property law.
The work schedule of most lawyers is a 40-hour week in a standard office atmosphere. However, many lawyers travel to court or other locations to meet with clients and gather research.
The following table provides a quick insight into the career of a lawyer in Alabama.

  • Education Required
  • Training
  • Licenses/Certifications
  • Key Skills
  • Annual Mean Salary (2019)-US
  • Job Outlook(2018-2028)
  • Annual Mean Salary (2019)-Alabama
  • Professional or Doctoral Degree
  • Usually incorporated in a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree
  • Lawyers have to pass the Alabama Bar Exam
  • Analytical Skills, Reasoning Skills, Interpersonal Skills, Research Skills, Writing Skills, Speaking Skills, Problem-solving Skills
  • $145,300
  • 6%
  • $114,240

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Outlook for a Lawyer in Alabama

According to data from O*Net Online, jobs for lawyers in Alabama are expected to grow by 8% in the years from 2016 to 2026. This growth will add an approximate 350 new jobs to the profession on an annual basis. Even though the need for legal services will be present, there will be tough competition for the jobs available. This will be because more students are graduating from law school each year than there are jobs available.

Steps to Become a Lawyer in Alabama

In order to become a lawyer in Alabama, students will have to complete the following process:

Complete a Bachelor’s Degree

This is the first step towards becoming a lawyer. All law schools require a 4-year long undergraduate degree in any major. Completing this degree in pre-law can be an added bonus, though it is not a requirement.

Pass the LSAT

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a standardized test used by law schools across the country as a measure to determine the aptitude of applicants.

Complete Law School

Law school is usually 3-years long and results in a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree. It covers multiple topics, such as property law, constitutional law, civil procedures and legal writing. Students may choose to specialize in a particular area of law, such as tax, corporate law or labor law.

Pass the Bar Exam

In order to become a licensed lawyer, students must be admitted to the bar. Each state has its own bar exam. Aspiring lawyers in Alabama would have to pass the Alabama Bar Exam administered by the Alabama State Bar.

Continuing Education

The complexity of the legal system requires that lawyers stay up to date with the latest developments in the world of law. Most states require lawyers to complete some form of continuing education, which could include taking courses offered by state bar associations.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Lawyer in Alabama?

In order to become a lawyer, candidates will have to complete a 4-year long bachelor’s degree, followed by a 3-year long Juris Doctor (J.D.). So all in all, it would take 7 years to complete the education required to become a lawyer in Alabama. The bar exam may take an additional few months to clear.

What Are the Requirements to Become a Lawyer in Alabama?

In order to become a lawyer in Alabama, candidates will have to meet the following requirements:

  • Get a bachelor’s degree
  • Complete law school
  • Appear for the Alabama Bar Exam
  • Continue education to stay updated

How Much Can I Earn as a Lawyer in Alabama?

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, lawyers in Alabama made an annual mean income of $114,240 in 2019, while the national mean income was $145,300. The highest paying industry for this occupation in the US was Cable and Other Subscription Programming, which paid an annual mean wage of $224,970. This was followed by the Motion Picture and Video Industries, which paid $216,800 and Highway, Street, and Bridge Construction, which paid $215,850.